Suicide and the Holidays

Suicide is more common around the holidays, right? Wrong. 1. It is a myth that suicide rates increase around the holidays. Perhaps because we hope that the holidays will be a time of enhanced joy and connection, it feels especially poignant when someone dies by suicide at this time of year.

Healthier, Longer Lives

Isn’t that what we all want? To be healthy, and if healthy, enjoy long lives? So why should it be any different for someone with serious mental illness? But that’s not how it typically goes. The odds have it that individuals with serious mental illness (schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders,

World Mental Health Day – Focus on Youth

October 10th is World Mental Health Day. Every year this date calls our attention to a particular mental health priority. This year’s focus is Young People and Mental Health in a Changing World. The focus on young people is fitting given that half of all mental disorders begin by age 14

Men, Mental Illness, & Suicide – Your Questions Answered

“Huh…what?” I have heard from many of you over the past few weeks with questions regarding my posts on men, male athletes, mental illness, and suicide.  Your questions bear repeating and warrant replies. Sometimes the data are difficult to believe, and sometimes they are difficult to describe. So, here’s some

#ArmMeWith…

This week, the President of the United States met with survivors of another deadly school shooting, this time at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida where 17 people were killed on the 14th of February. Let me say it again, the President of the United States invited survivors to the

Five Courageous Women, Five Personal Stories, Five Documentary Films

1 in 4. That’s the statistic for how many of us will have a mental illness over the course of our lifetimes – sometimes fleeting, sometimes enduring, always significant. At that rate, if it’s not ourselves, it will be a parent, sibling, partner, child, friend or colleague. Some of us

Stories that Inspire

Newspaper headlines and breaking news on CNN are dominated by the drama of crisis and disaster. When we rely on this coverage to tell the story of mental illness, we are led to believe that the majority of people with mental disorders are violent, dangerous and sleeping on church steps.

Pomp and Circumstance

Okay, I admit I am a graduation junkie. I get choked up with the first notes of Pomp and Circumstance and my tissues are soggy by the time the newly anointed graduates toss their mortar boards with tassels in the air. What’s the big deal, and what does this have

Decibels Rising

More and more people are finding a way to talk about their experiences with mental illness. It is nothing short of a historic shift, and it’s happening locally and globally. Speaking up also requires listening more carefully; otherwise, as the expression goes, the message will fall on deaf ears. Previously,

Lessons From Prince and Other Royals

Last week, Prince, the beloved pop icon, died from what appears to be a drug overdose while Princess Kate, Prince William and Prince Harry lent royal support to The Heads Together campaign – reminding us that even those who seem invincible can be affected by mental illness and those with a public platform can